Academic Advantages: FIRST YEAR

LCumberland Students Listening in Classawyering and Legal Reasoning (LLR)

Unique to Cumberland School of Law is Lawyering and Legal Reasoning, a six-hour graded course for first-year students that provides hands-on, practical experience in basic skills.

Students are divided into law firms with full-time faculty as "senior partners."  Each is assigned a case which involves client interviews, writing legal memoranda, negotiating with opposing counsel, drafting settlement agreements, conducting discovery through interrogatories, drafting a motion for summary judgment with accompanying brief and presenting argument on the motion to a trial court judge, writing an appellate brief and presenting oral argument to the appellate panel.

During LLR, students learn to research, write, speak, and most importantly, think like a lawyer, by learning skills such as:

  • Interviewing clients

  • Writing legal memoranda

  • Negotiating a settlement with opposing counsel

  • Drafting a settlement agreement

  • Drafting a complaint or answer

  • Conducting discovery, drafting interrogatories and answers

  • Drafting a motion for summary judgment with accompanying brief and presenting argument on the motion to a trial court judge

  • Writing an appellate brief and presenting oral argument to the appellate panel 

The Called to the Bar program is a subcomponent of the LLR course that begins during orientation and focuses largely on professionalism, ethics, and the duties of lawyering. Eight required sessions are held during the year. The program also includes a forum for students to receive personal guidance and support through mentoring, as well as individual assistance on written assignments.

The Caruthers Fellows, chosen by the LLR faculty, are second- or third-year students who serve as mentors and assist first-year students with the development of research, writing, negotiation, and other basic skills.

It has been reported by employers to the law school that Cumberland School of Law graduates are given more responsibility in their first jobs than their colleagues who have attended other law schools. This success is attributed to the practical skills training gained during the LLR and advocacy programs.
 


Helpful Cumberland Navigator:  Related Pages
Second Year
Course Requirements
Course Offerings
Joint-Degrees
International Study
National Competition Results
Organizations
History/Legacy



Page last updated: Fri, 02/22/2013 - 09:29